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Top 10 jobs for travellers: continued

Top 10 jobs for travellers: continued6: Geoscientist

Geoscience, or geology, is the scientific study of the structure, evolution and dynamics of the earth and its natural resources. Geoscientists work in a wide variety of different areas from mines and pits to buildings and dams.

Environmental geoscientists are concerned with the air, water and land in or on which people, animals or plants live.

What qualifications do I need?

The minimum requirement for becoming a professional geoscientist is normally a first degree in one of the geosciences - geology, geophysics, geochemistry, petroleum geology, engineering geology or exploration geology. Many employers prefer candidates with a postgraduate qualification. Work experience is also useful.

How much does it pay?

Salaries may range from around £25,000 to more than £50,000 a year.

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7: European Union official

Officials in the European Union (EU) work to advance the shared aims of its 27 member states. They work within nine different EU institutions, the largest being the European Commission.

Most EU staff work as administrators or assistants. Administrators may work in general policy or in specialist fields such as law, IT, science, research and finance.

What qualifications do I need?

Applicants for administrator posts need to be graduates. Administrator applicants do not require a degree but are expected to have two to three years' work experience.

Candidates must be citizens of an EU member state. They need to be fluent in at least two official languages of the EU. Some of the EU institutions offer traineeships for graduates, usually lasting three to five months.

How much does it pay?

Salaries start from around £27,000 a year for new assistants, while senior managers can earn up to £135,000.

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8: Insurance surveyor

Insurance surveyors, also known as risk surveyors and risk analysts, conduct surveys on buildings, sites, machinery or transportation, which require insurance. They produce written reports, which are passed to insurance underwriters, and the information produced will determine the terms and conditions of insurance policies.

What qualifications do I need?

It is usual to have had a few years' experience in insurance, often in underwriting, before training as an insurance surveyor. People enter insurance with qualifications that range from GCSEs to a degree. Some enter through an Apprenticeship in retail financial services. The Diploma in business, administration and finance may be relevant for this work.

Engineering insurance surveyors need relevant engineering qualifications, often at degree level. Some begin on Apprenticeships, training in engineering and work their way up to surveying.

How much does it pay?

Salaries may range from around £22,000 a year for trainee surveyors to £100,000 for senior specialist surveyors.

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9: Sport and exercise scientists

Sport and exercise scientists help people to improve their sporting performance or their general health. They tend to specialise in either sport science (supporting athletes or sports club) or exercise science (improving the health of individuals).

What qualifications do I need?

A degree in sport and exercise science is normally required, although it is not necessary to have any particular aptitude for sport. It may also be possible to enter this career with a degree in a related subject such as psychology or physical education.

How much does it pay?

Salaries may range from around £18,000 to over £60,000 a year.

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10: Agent/Manager

Agents and managers represent performers and other creative talent in the film, television, radio, publishing, sport and entertainment industries. They promote their clients' careers, try to secure the best work for them for the highest fee and may also manage their business affairs.

What qualifications do I need?

There is no set entry route and agents/managers come from a variety of backgrounds. Experience, enthusiasm, industry knowledge and the ability to make contacts are often more important than qualifications.

Some agents/managers enter this area of work by managing friends' careers, particularly in the music industry. Others start off as performers and learn from the experience of promoting their own talents. Experience in a related field, such as publishing, broadcasting or the recording industry, may be useful.

How much does it pay?

Agents' salaries are dependent on the work they secure for clients. They usually keep between 10 and 20 per cent of the overall fee. Salaries may range from £15,000 a year for trainees to £100,000 or more for the most successful agents.

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